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Bobby Doerr, Red Sox Hall of Fame Second Baseman and Former Teammate of Moe Berg, Dies at 99

November 15, 2017

Bobby Doerr, the Hall of Fame second baseman dubbed the “Silent Captain” of the Boston Red Sox by longtime teammate and friend Ted Williams, has died. Doerr died on Monday October 13 at the age of 99. He played on the same Red Sox team as Moe Berg in the 1937, 1938, and 1939 seasons and was one of the players Moe coached on the Red Sox in the 1940 and 1941 seasons.

In the statement released by the Red Sox on Tuesday October 14, Red Sox owner John Henry said: “Bobby Doerr was part of an era of baseball giants and stood out as one himself. And even with his Hall of Fame achievements at second base, his character and personality outshined it all. He will be missed.”

Bobby Doerr pictured in 1942 (Source: NBCNews/AP)

Doerr was signed out of the old Pacific Coast League in 1937, where he had played for the San Diego Padres with Ted Williams, who was signed to the Red Sox out of the same scouting trip. In 1938, Doerr became a regular in the Red Sox lineup as their second baseman. Doerr played 14 seasons with the Red Sox and joined his old friend Ted Williams in the Hall of Fame in 1986. He had a .288 career average, helped the Red Sox to the 1946 World Series, and was a nine-time All-Star.

In 1988, the Red Sox retired his No. 1 jersey at Fenway Park and the team honored Doerr with a 2004 World Series ring after breaking their 86-year championship drought.

Doerr, who was known for being modest, finished his career with 2,042 hits, 223 home runs and 1,247 RBIs. His six seasons with at least 100 RBIs was not matched by another second baseman for 25 years. He was frequently cited one of the best AL fielders.

After retiring as a player, Doerr returned to the Red Sox first as a scout from 1957-1966 and then as the first base coach from 1967-1969. He then became the hitting coach for the Toronto Blue Jays from 1977-1981.

Doerr’s friendship with Ted Williams, Johnny Pesky and Dom DiMaggio is well known and commemorated in a statue unveiled at Fenway in 2010. He also played on the team with Hall of Famers Joe Cronin, Jimmie Foxx, and Lefty Grove.

Doerr retired to Junction City, Oregon with his wife, Monica Roseman Terpin, and their son, Don. When asked if he wished he played “now,” in 1990, Doerr responded: “No. I know the money is better, but I just feel fortunate to have played then. I think we had more fun. We played the game hard, but there is so much pressure on these guys.”

Bobby Doerr was the oldest living Major League Baseball player and was the last living person who played in the major leagues in the 1930s. We join the baseball community in mourning his passing and remembering his legacy as on of the Red Sox greats from the Golden Age of baseball.

For more on Bobby Doerr and his legacy, see this link.

Ray Robinson, Who Wrote of Gehrig the Man, Dies at 96

by: DANIEL E. SLOTNIK NOV. 9, 2017

Ray Robinson, a longtime magazine editor who wrote well-received biographies of baseball stars from his youth like Christy Mathewson and Lou Gehrig, died on Nov. 1 in Manhattan. He was 96.

His daughter, Nancy Miringoff, said he died a day after having a stroke.

For many years Mr. Robinson made a living as an editor at magazines like Seventeen and Good Housekeeping, but baseball and other sports were always his passion. Though he was never a professional baseball reporter, his life was so infused with the game that he could, and did, more than hold his own in discussions about the sport.

His biographies include “Matty, an American Hero: Christy Mathewson of the New York Giants” (1994), about the star pitcher of the early 20th century, and “Rockne of Notre Dame: The Making of a Football Legend” (1999), about the celebrated Notre Dame football coach.

His sportswriting, which mixed careful research with personal recollections, was more realistic than reverential.

“He could be trusted not to exaggerate a story or a fact; it was what it was, and you could trust Ray’s memory,” Marty Appel, the author of “Pinstripe Empire: The New York Yankees From Before the Babe to After the Boss” (2012) and other baseball books, said in an interview on Tuesday.

One of Mr. Robinson’s favorite players, and subjects, was Gehrig, the Hall of Fame Yankee first baseman who long held the record for consecutive games played, with 2,130, and who died at 37 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a degenerative ailment now widely known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

In many articles and in the book “Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time” (1990), Mr. Robinson portrayed the famously humble and hard-working Gehrig as a human being instead of the mythical hero many see him as, without hiding his own reverence.

Mr. Robinson at Magazine Management, where he worked as an editor, in the 1950s.
“Suited up, Gehrig looked bovine, unathletic,” Mr. Robinson wrote. “His appearance earned him the uncomely nickname of ‘Biscuit Pants.’ But shouldn’t one win points for modesty, decency and determination? I thought so, and of all the Yankees, it was Lou I cherished the most.”

One undeniably superhuman moment of Gehrig’s career was his farewell speech at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939. Mr. Robinson, who was there and called the speech “baseball’s Gettysburg Address,” told The Daily News in 2014 that the sound system made it hard to make out all of Gehrig’s words, but that an almost religious solemnity descended over the stadium as Gehrig spoke.

“I have no way of knowing if 60,000 people were crying,” he said, “but I had tears in my eyes.”

Full Article: here

Dodgers’ Joc Pederson breaks record for most homers by a Jewish player in one World Series

Joc Pederson of the Los Angeles Dodgers has set a new home run record for Jewish players in one World Series.

Pederson, a lefty-swinging outfielder, blasted a homer in the seventh inning of his club’s 3-1 win over the visiting Houston Astros in Game 6. The shot, to left field, was his third of the Series and moved Pederson past Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg, the Detroit Tigers’ slugger who had two homers in the 1934 Fall Classic.

Greenberg still holds the mark for most runs batted in by a Jewish player in one World Series — at least for now, since there’s another game left — with seven. Pederson has five, as does Alex Bregman, the Astros’ Jewish third baseman, along with two home runs.

Written by Ron Kaplan.

Link to full article

Moe Berg featured in Episode Nine of “Genius” Series about Albert Einstein

National Geographic’s 10-episode first season of “Genius” was a fascinating series on Albert Einstein’s life, based on Walter Isaacson’s book Einstein: His Life and Universe. The show aired its finale on June 20th and includes scenes with Berg’s dangerous assignment in the OSS during World War II.

Episode nine opens with Berg receiving a gun and cyanide pill with instructions to listen to Heisenberg’s lecture at the Zurich Polytechnic Institute in Switzerland. He’s told specifically to listen for words and phrases like, “heavy water, plutonium and fast fission.” “If anything he says leads you to believe he’s developing an atomic bomb,” Berg’s told, “Kill him!”

Later, Einstein is listening to a broadcast of a Red Sox game at Fenway Park in 1939 and Moe Berg is referred to as “Einstein in knickers” because he’s the most intelligent of all the baseball players.

Berg’s final scene is in December 1944, as he listens to Heisenberg’s lecture and walks with the German physicist afterwards over cobblestone streets.

While not portrayed in the “Genius” series, Berg did meet Einstein after the war. In Nicholas Dawidoff’s book, The Catcher was a Spy the meeting is described: “Mr. Berg, exclaimed the scientist, “you teach me baseball, and I’ll teach you mathematics.” He paused a moment and added, “But let’s forget it. I’m sure you’d learn mathematics faster than I’d learn baseball.”

Office of Strategic Services (OSS) celebrates 75th Anniversary with ceremony on Navy Hill in Washington, DC on June 16th

Program Cover for the OSS 75th Anniversary Celebration

The OSS was created in 1942 by President Roosevelt and was the World War II predecessor to the CIA, US Special Operations Command and the Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research. The celebration was held at the site of the first OSS and CIA headquarters on Navy Hill, which was recently added to the National Register of Historic places.

Moe Berg served as a spy for the OSS during World War II and was recruited by OSS Director General William (Wild Bill) Donovan.

Read more about the ceremony here. You can link to the OSS society website here.

Fielding Dreams: Washington’s Jewish Ballplayers – Thursday, July 20, 7:30 – 9:30 PM Eldavitch DC JCC

Award-winning filmmaker Aviva Kempner will be taking part in a revealing discussion about Washington’s history of Jewish ballplayers. She will be sitting down with sports attorney and former Washington Senator’s broadcaster Philip Hochberg and author Frederic J. Frommer (You Gotta Have Heart: A History of Washington Baseball from 1859 to the 2012 National League East Champions) at Eldavitch DCJCC as they will cover names such as Moe Berg (catcher, scholar, spy); the subject of Kempner’s new film, Elliott Maddox (the only Black Jew to play in the Major Leagues); and Jason Marquis (the first observant Jew to play for the Nats). Tickets are available here.

Highlights of the 1945 Baseball Season

Photograph by Washingtonian, Getty Images and Press Association Inc.

Here is a delightful Washingtonian article about how the Senators were upstaged by Hank Greeenberg’s hitting in 1945.

“Legendary slugger Hank Greenberg, just out of the Army Air Corps, had rejoined the Detroit Tigers. And on this last day of the season, it was Greenberg who stepped to the plate in the ninth inning of a game between his Tigers and the St. Louis Browns.

The game was more than 800 miles away, but Washington fans were paying attention. If St. Louis held its lead and won the second game of the doubleheader, the Senators would be one win from the World Series. If not, Washington was done. Alas, it wasn’t to be. Greenberg hit a grand slam, giving the Tigers the game—and ending Washington’s season. By the next spring, as regulars replaced wartime understudies, the team would return to its usual mediocrity.”

Read the rest of the story here.

Go to the official website for Ciesla’s documentary on Hank Greenberg for more stats and stories, The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg by Aviva Kempner.

As Baseball Season Starts, Still Cheering for Team Israel

By Aviva Kempner

When the Major League Baseball season started this week, some of us Jewish baseball fans are still reminiscing how well Team Israel did last month in the World Baseball Classic, actually winning four games.

Team Israel was the closest thing we ever had to having our own dream Jewish American lineup. We American Jews can’t help but be jealous of the holy land for recruiting our professional American Jewish baseball players to compete for Team Israel in the World Baseball Classic games. Labeled the Cinderella of the series, the Israeli baseball team gave American Jewry lots to cheer for, since most of the team members were Americans. It’s a hoot that we have been creating fantasy Jewish baseball teams in our heads for decades, and now Israel got to claim the accomplished Jewish dream team.


Read the whole article here

All the Jewish Major Leaguers to Watch- Baseball 2017

DETROIT, MI – JULY 20: Manager Brad Ausmus #7 of the Detroit Tigers celebrates a win over the Seattle Mariners with Ian Kinsler #3 on July 20, 2015 at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers defeated the Mariners 5-4. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)

(JTA) — In baseball, they say time begins on Opening Day. Everyone has a chance for a fresh start. Most of the old familiar names are back, although some have new addresses. If you count Detroit Tigers manager Brad Ausmus, there are nine Jews who begin the year on Major League rosters. But then there’s the question of what to do about Ty Kelly of the New York Mets: Is he or isn’t he? That’s still a matter of debate among those who decide on such matters.

Read the rest of the article and find out more here.

Happy Birthday, Moe Berg!

The mysterious baseball spy Morris “Moe” Berg was born on March 2, 1902.  His parents immigrated to New York from the Ukraine. When Berg passed away in New Jersey on May 29, 1972, he was 70 years old.

Moe caught and fielded for five American baseball teams from the 1920s through 1939 during baseball’s Golden Age.  Berg also had a secret life spying on Japan while participating in an exhibition game and working for the US Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War II. He played a prominent role in US efforts to undermine the German atomic bomb program and is now remembered most as the catcher who was a spy. Berg is considered a hero, especially to American Jews.

Moe Berg, Photo: National Baseball Hall of Fame

 

A nurse recalled that his final words were “How did the Mets do today?” But his death was his final mystery and no one knows for sure everything he did during World War II or where his remains are. Although his ashes were buried in a cemetery outside Newark, it’s thought that his sister Ethel dug up the urn and had his ashes spread over Mount Scopus in Israel.  We are trying to uncover that mystery.

Berg declined receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1945, (his sister later accepted it on his behalf). Later this year he will be receiving the Congressional Gold Medal posthumously along with the rest of the WWII OSS spies.  The event will coincide with the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS).

If you are inclined to raise a glass to toast Berg’s bravery today, we can suggest what to drink. Linda McCarthy, past curator of the CIA museum, reminded me that Pouilly-Fuissé was his favorite wine.

Here’s to Moe, 115 years after he was born, who will finally be celebrated in two films being made this year.

The dramatic film, The Catcher Was a Spy, directed by Ben Lewin, is being shot presently in Prague.  Robert Rodat (Saving Private Ryan) wrote the script that is based on the great bio by Nicholas Dawidoff. Starring Paul Rudd as Berg, the film also features Sienna Miller, Guy Pearce, Paul Giamatti and Jeff Daniels.

Here at The Ciesla Foundation we are making a feature documentary on Moe Berg, another famous Jewish baseball player like the one we featured in The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg.  We are already done with the research and the script treatment.  We expect the film will be out sometime during baseball season in 2018.

Thanks to William Levine, executive producer of the documentary, for making it all possible. Check moebergfilm.org regularly for news about the film.

Just remember Moe played for five baseball teams, but he spied for only one country.  Here’s to you, Moe, on your birthday.

Aviva Kempner

 

Moe with the Washington Senators in 1933